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Learn how to brew the perfect cup of coffee at home every time.

Coffee recipes for every popular home brew method.

Everyday there are millions of Google searches for recipes. The perfect cup of coffee isn’t magic, it’s science. The recipes below use coffee extraction methods to achieve the perfect cup of coffee every time. For pour overs and Chemex, we use a coffee to water ratio of 1:16. That means for every one gram of water we use one gram of coffee. Just like all scientific experiments, using a set of adjustable variables will help you dial-in the perfect brew. Every coffee brews a little differently. Experiment by changing one variable at a time until you get the perfect balance of bitter, acid and sweetness. Try to taste for the Thread Coffee tasting notes found on our bags. The tasting notes represent flavour, acidity, and body. 

Variables:

Coffee to Water Ratio (we start with 1:16)

Water Temperature (we start with 205 degrees)

Coffee Grind Size (fine to coarse depending on time)

Brew Time (1:30-5 mins)  (cold brew 12-24 hours)

The Chemex glass brewer is an American icon. It was created in the US in 1941 by chemist Dr. Peter Schlumbohm. The Chemex was displayed in the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in 1943 as one of the best-designed products of the decade. 

The Chemex is a beautiful glass brewer that is aesthetically pleasing in all mid-century modern rooms. However, it’s really the double-bonded Chemex filters that revolutionized the way this product brews coffee.

The Chemex double bonded paper filter was strategically created to aid in the perfect extraction of coffee. The Chemex paper filter catches the oily and carbon structures in its grasp while allowing the delicate flavor and pleasant chemical compounds to flow through to the final cup. The Chemex always provides a clean cup in its profile. If you want to taste high quality coffees without tasting the brewing method, the Chemex is the perfect device. And always use the Chemex paper filters for the best quality.

 

Chemex (Serves 2)

Grind 50 grams of coffee medium coarse

Prep filter with hot water

Place ground coffee in Chemex and gently shake to level bed of grounds

Pour 100 grams of hot water in a circular motion to cover the grounds and allow 30 seconds for the bloom 

Pour an additional 100 grams of water at 30 second intervals 

Continue pulse brewing until you reach 800 grams of water

All water should be added by 4 minutes

Total brew time should come under 5 minutes

 

Hario V60 – a Japanese classic

Hario, a Tokyo based company founded in 1921, released the V60 only a decade ago. Hario had previously been known to manufacture chemical-use glass products before it developed its 100% naturally produced heatproof glass. These glass decanters are the perfect device to collect freshly brewed coffee and ensure that no flavors are released from the glass or infused into the coffee. The V60 brewer is named after vector 60, or the 60 degree angle of its cone. The interior is spiral ribbed to allow ample airflow through during brewing. The single hole at the bottom allows the coffee to brew through a single point of exit which allow the water and coffee to be in contact for longer. Pulse brewing gives some control over the flow speed. Change it up based on your own tastes!

V60 Pour Over

Grind 23 grams of coffee medium fine 

Prep filter with hot water

Add the coffee to the filter and gently shake to level bed of grounds

Pour 50 grams of boiled water in a circular motion to cover the grounds 

Allow 30 seconds for the bloom 

Pour an additional 100 grams of water 

Pour an additional 100 grams of water at 1:15

Pour the final 100 grams of water at 2 minutes and let drain completely 

The final weight should be approximately 350 grams of water and it should take about 3- 4 minutes to have a finished cup

French Press – A History

Get ready for a startling fact..the French Press was actually started in Italy! Two patents by two different Italian makers were filed for a version of the coffee press, however,  it wasn’t until 1958 when Swiss inventor Faleiro Bondanini filed his patent under the name Chambord that it really took off as a brewing device. The popularization of the Chambord French Press is why today we all adoringly call any coffee press a French Press.

The French Press is a full immersion brewing device with a metal mesh filter. It’s as simple as a brewing device can get, and yet, it brews rich and delicious cups of coffee without any paper filters. If you like your coffee to have a rich and syrupy mouthfeel or if you like your coffee with cream, this device is well suited for your needs.

We have a simple recipe below that will give you a perfect extraction. Here are some common issues you might need to troubleshoot, if the press is too hard to press down, the grind size is too fine. If all the grounds sink to the bottom, the grind size is too coarse. 

Clean after each use to ensure that the oils don’t get trapped in the fine metal mesh screen. If you want to make cold brew in the press, just add cold water,  leave it out overnight and press down in the morning. 

French Press (Serves 2)

Grind 60 grams of coffee coarse 

Pour 120 grams of boiled water and stir to saturate the grounds evenly 

Allow it to bloom for 30 seconds

Pour the remaining water, total 700 grams allow it to sit for 4 minutes 

Pour the coffee as soon as its finished brew to avoid over extraction 

Aeropress was invented in 2005 by Alan Adler, a scientist who invented the Aerobie frisbee. This little coffee device is the most widely adopted new inventions for brewing coffee in the 21st century.  Many innovators and inventors come up with new ways to brew coffee every year, but the Aeropress has made a serious splash. Today, there are AeroPress competitions worldwide.

This brewing device can be used to create espresso like beverages without an espresso machine. It brews with both immersion and pressure to create espresso consistency. In our recipe, we’ve outlined the steps needed to brew a perfect and clean cup that serves one, but the options go far beyond this recipe. 

Aeropress has elevated the user experience for home and cafe brewing. If you choose, you can brew an espresso style concentrate and then dilute to achieve 2-3 cups in under 60 seconds. There are many ways to brew an AeroPress, but this is our chosen method. 

The inverted method for AeroPress involves a little more time, only 2 minutes in total, and utilizes the inverted method, meaning the plunger is place in securely and the entire device is flipped over before brewing. We find this method allows for less heat to escape and give a better result. 

Thread Coffee AeroPress recipe:

Grind 17 grams of coffee slightly coarser than espresso

Put the plunger in the main chamber to form a seal. Invert so brew chamber is facing upward. Place paper filter in the top and wet with hot water. 

Brew with 195 degree water

Add coffee to brew chamber and pour 50 grams of hot water. Stir twice with paddle. Allow to bloom for 30 seconds. 

Pour and additional 170 grams and allow to brew for 2 minutes total.

Flip Aeropress over on top of a mug and push down plunger slowly. Enjoy!

Hario V60 – a Japanese classic

Hario, a Tokyo based company founded in 1921, released the V60 only a decade ago. Hario had previously been known to manufacture chemical-use glass products before it developed its 100% naturally produced heatproof glass. These glass decanters are the perfect device to collect freshly brewed coffee and ensure that no flavors are released from the glass or infused into the coffee. The V60 brewer is named after vector 60, or the 60 degree angle of its cone. The interior is spiral ribbed to allow ample airflow through during brewing. The single hole at the bottom allows the coffee to brew through a single point of exit which allow the water and coffee to be in contact for longer. Pulse brewing gives some control over the flow speed. Change it up based on your own tastes!

Flash brew — Japanese Style Iced Coffee — V60 Pour Over

Grind 23 grams of coffee slightly finer than for pour over 

Add 200 grams ice to mug 

Wet filter with hot water to get rid of any paper taste and warm the V60 

Add the coffee to the filter and gently shake to level bed of grounds

Add 50 grams of water 

Allow 30 seconds for bloom

Pour 50 grams every 30 seconds until you reach 200-215 grams of water

Allow to drain completely 

Swirl to mix and cool down the coffee completely 

Moka Pot — Stovetop Espresso 

Alfonso Bialetti, an Italian inventor, created and released the Moka Pot in 1933. This stovetop espresso maker was the first coffee brewer for the home that could mimic the commercial espresso that had become so popular in Italy over the previous 50 years. The Moka Pot uses the same principles of an espresso machine to make espresso like coffee. It was named after the port of Mocha, or Moka, the Yemen port that was once the hot spot for coffee export. 

Hot water is boiled and pressurized before it is pushed through a finely ground coffee puck. The final product is a rich and syrupy espresso like product, minus the crema.  The Moka Pot made its way around the world as in-home coffee consumption increased.  Today, it is an iconic coffee maker with over 330 million units sold worldwide. We’ve created a recipe that takes the Moka Pot to a new level fit for a 21st Century coffee nerd. You’ll need a scale, a kettle, a stovetop and access to a sink to complete this task, but believe us, it will showcase the coffee brilliantly.

Moka Pot Recipe — Stovetop Espresso 

Grind 18 grams of coffee fine to medium fine

Pre-boil 150 grams of water 

Once the water is boiled add it to the bottom chamber

Add the coffee to the basket and screw on the collecting chamber

Place on stove to bring the water to a boil

Allow the collecting chamber to fill until the coffee turns a caramel color 

Once the coffee is finished brewing run the bottom chamber under cool water to stop the process and prevent burning the coffee

Toddy Cold Brew Method

We love the Toddy cold brew method because it offers the ease of immersion brewing along with the clean cup profile of filter brewing. Toddy home cold brew kits have a thick felt filter that catches the dense oils that are produced during the long overnight extraction. The paper filter does a great job of catching unwanted flavors and oils and helps make clean up a breeze. Of course you can make immersion cold brew in any vessel, but Toddy makes it a clean experience, in the cup and in the kitchen.

Cold Brew — Toddy Home Brewer

Grind a 12oz bag of coffee coarsest grind 

Prep 7 cups of cold filtered water

Insert stopper into brew chamber and place felt filter into the bottom of brew basket

Pour coffee grounds into Toddy paper filter and place in brew chamber

Cover with 3.5 cups of cold filtered water

Stir to saturate all grounds

Pour remaining 3.5 cups of water to cover

GIve a final stir to ensure total saturation

Cover and place aside to brew at room temperature 12 hours

Remove stopper and allow cold brew concentrate to flow completely into glass decanter

We recommend a dilution of 1:1 with cold filtered water 

Serve over ice 

What is Decaf Coffee?

All of our decaf coffees are Mountain Water Processed in an organic certified facility. This decaffeination process involves a series of water baths with organic compounds that extract caffeine from the beans. Decaf coffee can have more water density due to the beans continued contact with water before a final drying phase.

This process and water density is most present during the roasting process. We use a combination of archived roast data and quality assurance tastings to ensure our decaf coffee tastes as great as any of our caffeinated coffees.

Enjoy decaf coffee with any of our brew recipes. We roast our decaf coffees to taste great in every brew recipe above.

The Coffee Taster's Wheel

How to Taste Coffee

Have you ever wondered what the tasting notes on bags of coffee really mean? For us at Thread Coffee, we taste for the following attributes in our quality assurance program:

  • Aroma
  • Flavor
  • Acidity
  • Body
  • Finish

We smell the aroma from the freshly ground coffee, then taste for flavor, acidity, body and finish. 

Our tasting notes generally indicate flavor, acidity and body. 

We use the flavor wheel to pinpoint exact flavors of acidity, such as the acidity found in a lemon versus the acidity found in a pineapple. Some coffees have more sweetness while others are rich and buttery in mouthfeel. 

For our final notes, we always indicate the finish. Does it leave your mouth watering? Is it dry? Does the flavor linger? 

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